Lane Splitting – Good or Bad 0

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Earlier this week, a Ducati rider in Singapore perished when a SUV switched lane almost immediately after he turned on the indicator light, not noticing the Ducati rider is just beside his car most probably due to blind spot. So is lane filter good or bad?

In USA, not every state legalised lane splitting and recently Australia legalized it. I came across this posting in my regular Whatsapp group and I find it interesting and decided to share. The mini article below;

Lane splitting is an unspoken contract between riders and drivers. Riders don’t wait for stopped cars, and in return, they don’t make the cars wait for them. Where many drivers get it wrong is that they see lane splitting as “queue jumping” that will cause each car to go one further spot back in the queue. In truth, a filtering bike disappears from the queue altogether, the only time a motorcycle holds a car up is when it sits in traffic and acts like another car.

Filtering bikes work their way to the front of stopped traffic at red lights, and accelerate away much quicker than the cars around them. When they reach the next stoppage, they disappear again between the lanes and no car is held up.

Certainly, this is a good deal for the rider, who arrives much earlier than the car driver. But every filtering rider has a positive effect on traffic flow that benefits every other motorist. A 2012 Belgian study found that if just 10 percent of drivers were to switch to motorcycles and filter through traffic, travel times would decrease for the remaining car drivers by some eight minutes per journey. This benefit would not exist if motorcyclists ignored the inherent advantages of their smaller, narrower vehicles and sat in line like cars.

The same study found considerable environmental benefits to lane splitting. Not because bikes emit less carbon (many larger bikes are as bad as cars), but because every bike that lane splits actively reduces the amount of time every other vehicle on the road spends sitting in traffic jams.

So the next time a rider wriggles past you in traffic, remember that it’s a win-win. The rider is saving time and money, and looking after their own safety, but they’re also making everyone else’s journey faster. So give them some space, for your own sake.

SHARE THIS TO EVERY DRIVER YOU KNOW. RIDE AND DRIVE SAFELY EVERYONE.

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    Born in school of petrol heads, raised practically drinking gasoline and smoked by the burning tires. Left the 4 wheels and took up 2 wheels as a direct result from mid age crisis. It's little crazy but am happy about it.

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